My Top 5 Writing Craft Books

Top 5 Writing Craft Books

Top 5 Writing Craft Books, because who doesn’t live a good top 5 list?

I am hard at work on a middle grade novel set in Bermuda, and my graduate lecture for VCFA on The Alchemy of Radical Self-Belief, and it’s fun! And tough. And fun!

For my lecture, I’m reading a particularly eye-opening book. Although not a writing craft book, it has powerful info on how to be a high performer in any field. It involves something called “deliberate practice.” Check it out by clicking below:

Talent is Overrated by Geoff Colvin

The List of Top 5 Writing Craft Books

Now that you have the bonus recommendation, right up front, here is my list of great writing craft books, in no particular order:

Self-Editing for Fiction Writers

Self Editing for Fiction Writers by Browne & King

Straightforward and usable. Brings clarity to the revision process. Many aha! moments lie within these pages. Think you understand show don’t tell? Read this and you may be in for a surprise. Great stuff on leaving space for the reader to collaborate with the story.

What's Your Story? by Marion Dane Bauer

What’s Your Story by Marion Dane Bauer

Especially helpful when you are mulling your story over before getting it on paper or into the computer. Says it’s for kids, and it’s great for adults, too. Simplest and clearest description of plot and conflict I have ever seen.

The Plot Whispere by Martha Alderson

The Plot Whisperer by Martha Alderson

This is the most intuitive approach to plot structure I’ve found. Plus it includes the writer herself in the hero’s journey. Stories, Alderson believes, are about the writer going on their own hero’s journey. How else can we bring the reader along?

Reading Like a Wrier by Francine Prose

 

Reading Like a Writer by Francine Prose

How to take your favorite books and learn exactly how the author did a particular thing, then do it yourself in your own work. You can learn to write crowd scenes like Tolstoy, or Omniscient POV like Rowling.

Getting Into Character by Brandilyn Collins

Getting Into Character: Seven Secrets A Novelist Can Learn From Actors by Brandilyn Collins

When the writer feels what their characters are feeling, the whole story pops off the page and feels authentic. This book has so many great techniques for inside-out, method character development.

Hope this is helpful to all you writers out there! Have a great week!

Have a favorite writing craft book I didn’t mention? Comment below and let us know why you love your favorites.

Writing Tools: My Love-Hate Relationship With Scrivener

Scrivener Program's Interface Margaret Mayo McGlynn

What is Scrivener?

For those who are saying, “what the heck is ‘Scrivener?'” here’s what it is, in brief.

For those of you who are saying “Isn’t that what Bartelby was?” your English Lit teacher is smiling in heaven, or in the teacher’s lounge with the burned coffee and permanently stained carpet.

Scrivener is a program, very reasonably priced, I might add, that helps writers of all kinds organize their files however they like.

What’s Cool About Scrivener?

It has various kind of templates, for instance, one for novels. It has a template tailor-made for NaNoWriMo.

What’s NaNoWriMo?

If you don’t know what NaNoWriMo is, then click any one of my links herein. NaNoWriMo is a magical internet land that encourages anyone and everyone to buckle down and write the novel that is aching to be born straight from the head of Zeus and begin slouching toward Jerusalem. It is, in short, a wonder of the modern age.

What’s Cool About Scrivener: Take 2

But back to Scrivener. The program has all kinds of useful templates for writing projects, for research papers, for scripts of various stripes and flavors.

The beauty of it is that it helps you organize your book the way you probably think about your book, that is, in scenes, chapters, and parts. And it’s wildly customizable. You can put all kinds of metadata in there. You can tag chapters and scenes with neat codes, notes to self about them, the which you can search later, when your buzz has worn off. You can import entire webpage contents to your research folders. You can color code the crap out of your text with custom highlighting colors. There’s a template for characters, for places, and you can design your own templates.

I love being able to drag scenes from chapter to chapter, willy nilly. I love that each chapter gets its own little index card on which you can put its synopsis. Love, love, love all of this.

Here’s a picture of the interface:

Scrivener Interface, and yes, that is the prologue of my novel Guardian of the Chalice, as it stands today

What’s Sucky About Scrivener?

But the hate starts when I try to sync it with my iPad. It doesn’t yet have its own iPad app, and the folks at Literature and Latte, who designed scrivener, have been promising and promising that the app will be here, any second.

But it’s not here yet. Oh, this novelist is getting so tired of waiting for it. When they finally deliver said app, they might do well to name it ‘Godot.’ Because, damn!

Compile This!

And don’t get me started on the Compile feature. I don’t understand why it’s even in there. Too customizable, and in a way that makes no sense to little ole me. Say I just want to export my Scrivener file of my novel just to a simple Word doc. Oh, the bewildering options that come up when I click ‘Compile,’ none of which work the way I would anticipate. To me, it seems somehow easier to have Scrivener translate my novel into Sanskrit than just to output it with some simple formatting, a page break in between chapters, sequentially numbered chapters, a header with, oh, I don’t know, my name and my book’s title upon it. Woe, woe to Compile. Fie upon it!

I got started, but now I’m stopping. Because I’ve decided to do a fast on complaining to clear my psychic space, if you know what I mean. And this sister from New Jersey, she can do her some complaining! Oh it is a major vice of mine.

There’s the Rub

In any event, I love Scrivener’s computer self so much that I can’t give it up, even though I want open a can o whup ass on its mobile “features” and its “Compile” excrementiness. Am I in a shame spiral? Possibly. Send your dollars today.

Any-hoo, below is a post I placed upon the Literature and Latte forum in which they innocently asked for feedback on the Mac version. I don’t think they saw me coming, do you?

Do you use Scrivener to work on your writerly stuff? If not, what do you use?

Please do scroll down and tell me all about your travails, and the little moments of your process, won’t you?

Thanks for visiting my blog. Comments more than welcome, if that’s possible in this space-time continuum.

:)Margaret

I have a love-hate with Scrivener, and here’s why:

Nothing else helps me organize and update my novel so well while I’m working on my laptop. But when I want to go mobile, oh then, dear reader, do I end up in a spot of difficulty.

Syncing with Simplenote doesn’t do it for me. The sorting files alphabetically thing would be great except I don’t want to inject extraneous chapter numbers in my chapter titles which I will then have to delete by hand in my final draft. And update manually when I change my order of chapters or add a new one. Over and over again.

I don’t like that when I rename a chapter or add a new one, I then have to go through the long checklist and make sure that I check the box for that new item when I sync. My world moves fast, and again, I wish there were a simple idiot-proof way to sync without all the time-consuming customizable stuff.

And I know this isn’t Scrivener’s fault, but I find that when I make changes to a Simplenote file in a browser, it doesn’t always transfer over to the same Simplenote file on my iPad.

Last night I was at my weekly writing class, and not once but twice I was not able to read the proper file, the most recent version, to my teacher, to whom I am paying a certain degree of cash in exchange for time. I found it to be an untenable situation.

My ideal scene is that the fine men and women of Literature and Latte really buckle down and get that gosh darned iPad app up and rocking. This year.

Or I may be looking for other options. Just sayin.’

And if you, lovely reader, have a bit of advice, an easy fix or even a medium difficult fix, which might solve my woes and result in smiles and relaxation on my part, oh, please do chime in!

Many thanks!



Margaret Mayo McGlynn
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San Francisco Writer’s Conference 2014 – Day 1

I am dog tired and it’s only day 1. This is intense. Lots of energy. Trying to learn how to pitch your novel rapidfire with only 5 clear bullet points, and networking like crazy, bonding as quickly as possible with folks doing the YA Fantasy genre thing. Many business cards were given, many gathered. Hope to God I can put faces with cards when it’s all done. Already building my YA Fantasy cohort.

Things I learned from the Children’s, Midgrade and YA Pitchathon

Who was there:

  • Natashya Wilson, Editor at Harlequin Teen (Editor of Julie Kagawa’s Iron Fey series)
  • Laurie McLean, Forward Literary Agency
  • Pam van Hylckama Vlieg, Forward Literary Agency
Gems and Nuggets:

Elevator Pitch:
  1. Just give them enough to interest them.
  2. Four sentences, 25 words or less.
  3. They really like the high-concept pitch, aka, it’s like Silence of the Lambs meets Charlotte’s Web, except good, because that would be sucky and what the heck does it mean, anyway? For this, use movies, books, and even video games that everyone knows.
  4. Never claim your novel is the next Harry Potter.
  5. It should be punchy.
  6. Don’t tell the end.
  7. Only tell the A plot.
  8. A YA Fantasy should be from 85 to 90k words.
  9. Another formula for the pitch “Who fights who to get what?”
Speed Dating:
  1. Your name
  2. Genre of your novel
  3. Title of Novel
  4. Word Count
Query Letters
  1. Don’t make me scroll
  2. First line is your logline high concept, aka Indiana Jones meets The Mummy (The Hook)
  3. Second paragraph is your back of book copy (The Book)
  4. Third paragraph is about you (The Cook)
  5. Another formula to describe the above is the The Hook, The Book, The Cook
Things I learned from Pitchcraft by Katherine Sands, Literary Agent
  1. In any pitch you only have time to cover 5 points, so choose them carefully
Basic Novel Pitch Formula
  1. Place (also time, era, modern day? 1066 Hastings? What?)
  2. Person, for instance, Bill, a 45-year old accountant who has always wanted to be an opera star
  3. Pivot: The dynamic moment that sets the whole story in motion.
General Notes About Pitchcraft
  • Set off sparks
  • Get interest
  • Show, don’t tell
  • Comparisons to other books, for example, “For readers who loved “The Hunger Games and the mortal instruments, my Contempory YA Fantasy pits the heroine against real historical magicians and alchemists who are seeking to use her power to make their immortality permanent.
I also attended a great talk by Rusty Shelton about ‘Discoverability in the Age of Social Media’ lots of great way to leverage social media to build ones brand, even as a novelist.
But as I am now a steaming pile of OMG, I must rewrite my pitch, asta la bye-bye for tonight!